Pennsylvania

  • July 12, 2024

    Law360 Names 2024's Top Attorneys Under 40

    Law360 is pleased to announce the Rising Stars of 2024, our list of 158 attorneys under 40 whose legal accomplishments belie their age.

  • July 12, 2024

    Expect NCAA To Dig In Heels On Employee Status After Ruling

    Even after Thursday's Third Circuit ruling clearing a path for college athletes to be considered employees, experts say the NCAA's record of litigating to the hilt on other athletes' rights matters portends a long road ahead before the issue is clarified.

  • July 12, 2024

    Real Estate Recap: Mall Makeovers, Military Land, Fundraising

    Catch up on this week's key developments by state from Law360 Real Estate Authority, including one Big Four retail leader's take on mall potential, the U.S. Treasury's increasing scrutiny of land deals with national security concerns, and a midyear look at private real estate fundraising trends.

  • July 12, 2024

    Chancery Tosses Centene Shareholders' Medicaid Fraud Suit

    The Delaware Chancery Court on Friday dismissed a Centene stockholder derivative lawsuit seeking damages from company directors and officers over allegations of a multistate Medicaid pharmacy benefit billing fraud scheme that the investors said could result in a $1.25 billion liability for the healthcare giant.

  • July 12, 2024

    Pa. Drive-In Dinged For Sleepovers In No-Campground Zone

    A Pennsylvania drive-in movie theater's "overnight passes" for guests to stay after a late-night showing or for multiple days of a movie marathon effectively made the theater into a campground and ran afoul of township zoning ordinances, a state appellate court ruled Friday.

  • July 12, 2024

    AbbVie Brings Atty-Client Privilege Fight To Supreme Court

    Drugmaker AbbVie has set its sights on the U.S. Supreme Court, asking justices to weigh in on a discovery battle over what it believes are privileged attorney-client communications relating to a "sham" Pennsylvania patent case.

  • July 12, 2024

    Pennsylvania Telecom Co. Will Pay $6.5M To Settle FCA Case

    A Western Pennsylvania telecommunications company has agreed to pay $6.5 million to settle claims that it violated federal law by inflating its costs in order to receive greater federal subsidies under the Federal Communication Commission's High-Cost Program, the U.S. Department of Justice said Friday.

  • July 12, 2024

    Contracting Co. Sues Home Depot Over Tool Rental Charges

    A Philadelphia-based contracting company has hit Home Depot USA Inc. with a proposed class action in Georgia, claiming the home improvement chain has systematically overcharged the customers of its tool rental program.

  • July 11, 2024

    Ah, Geez! Fox Sues Pop-Up For Copying 'The Simpsons' Pub

    Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp. slapped a Philadelphia special event company with a federal lawsuit Thursday claiming infringement of intellectual property rights it holds in "The Simpsons" animated series and movie, saying JMC Pop Ups is creating unauthorized replicas of Moe's Tavern from the popular show.

  • July 11, 2024

    Broker Says FINRA Owes Him Jury Trial After Jarkesy Ruling

    The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority has been hit with a suit from a member who says the regulator's allegations in an internal proceeding to sanction and expel him are assertions of common law fraud and therefore must be brought before a court and jury under the U.S. Supreme Court's recent Jarkesy decision.

  • July 11, 2024

    Cigna Objects To Ch. 11 Nursing Home Asset Sale Proposal

    Cigna Health and Life Insurance Co. asked a Pennsylvania bankruptcy judge to reject a sale process proposed by some of the debtors in a Pittsburgh-area nursing home network's consolidated Chapter 11 case, saying it gave the debtors too much leeway to change what contracts they will maintain.

  • July 11, 2024

    Pa. Condo Owner Group Takes Inner-Tower Conflict To Court

    The residents association of a downtown Pittsburgh condo building sued the building's commercial association in state court, alleging they have been improperly denied access to commercial sections of the building needed to complete HVAC repair work.

  • July 11, 2024

    3rd Circ. Greenlights FLSA Claims For NCAA Athletes

    Amateurism can't shield the NCAA from student-athletes' Fair Labor Standards Act claims, the Third Circuit ruled Thursday, laying out a test to sort out whether athletes can be considered employees under the federal statute.

  • July 11, 2024

    Pa. Man Admits To Dick's Sporting Goods Insider Trading

    A Pennsylvania man who netted nearly $825,000 in profits from Dick's Sporting Goods securities has pled guilty to insider trading using tips he obtained from a company employee, according to a Thursday announcement from the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • July 11, 2024

    Atty's Suit Against Aircraft Cos., Blank Rome Attys Survives

    A federal judge ruled in favor of a lawyer who alleges that aircraft companies and attorneys with Blank Rome LLP brought a baseless lawsuit against her in retaliation for switching from corporate defense to the plaintiffs bar, denying a motion to dismiss and allowing her lawsuit to continue.

  • July 11, 2024

    Talc Law Firms Beat J&J Subpoenas Seeking Funding Info

    The Beasley Allen Law Firm, another plaintiffs law firm and a litigation funder defeated subpoenas from Johnson & Johnson in talc litigation, with a special master reasoning that the broad swath of discovery permitted in federal courts still has limits. 

  • July 11, 2024

    Atty Fined For Missing 'Every Deadline' Since Feb. In Bias Suit

    A Philadelphia-based attorney has missed so many deadlines in a federal race bias lawsuit against a Penn State University branch campus that the senior circuit judge assigned to his case issued sanctions and a stern warning that a large caseload is no excuse on Thursday.

  • July 11, 2024

    Fiat Chrysler Says Exploding Minivan MDL Still Lacks Detail

    A Stellantis unit has asked a federal judge in Michigan to significantly pare back multidistrict litigation over a risk of spontaneous explosion in certain Chrysler plug-in hybrid minivans, arguing that many drivers' state claims are stale or are otherwise legally flawed.

  • July 11, 2024

    Ex-Union Leader Gets 6 Years For Bribery, Embezzlement

    John "Johnny Doc" Dougherty, the former business manager of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98 in Philadelphia, was sentenced Thursday to six years in prison after being convicted of bribing a city councilman and stealing over $500,000 from the union.

  • July 11, 2024

    GM's $50M Faulty Fuel Pump Deal Gets Early OK

    A Michigan federal judge on Thursday indicated he would give the initial approval to a $50 million settlement to end class claims that General Motors LLC sold trucks with faulty fuel pumps, clearing the way for GM to drop a Sixth Circuit appeal. 

  • July 11, 2024

    3rd Circ. Backs Toss Of $427K Arbitration Liability Award

    The Third Circuit upheld a lower court's nix of an arbitration award of more than $427,000 against a painting company over a union pension fund's withdrawal liability claims, determining Thursday that the fund waited too long to request payment under federal benefits law.

  • July 11, 2024

    Ga. Dem Helps Block NY Judge's Nomination From Advancing

    President Joe Biden's nomination of U.S. Magistrate Judge Sarah Netburn for the Southern District of New York failed to advance out the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday, after a key Democrat joined Republicans in opposition over her recommendation in a case that an inmate be transferred to a female facility.

  • July 11, 2024

    Biden Floats $2B To Drive US Auto Industry's EV Pivot

    The Biden administration on Thursday unveiled its latest initiative to bolster domestic automotive production by offering nearly $2 billion in grants to convert 11 auto manufacturing and assembly facilities that have been shuttered or are at risk of closing to build electric vehicles and related components.

  • July 10, 2024

    Rite Aid, DOJ Craft $410M Settlement Of Opioid Sale Claims

    Rite Aid agreed to a nearly $410 million settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice, the bulk of which will be an unsecured claim in the company's Chapter 11 case, that will put to bed allegations the pharmacy chain dispensed opioids illegally, the DOJ announced Wednesday.

  • July 10, 2024

    3rd Circ. Says Pretrial Detention Bars Bid For Removal Relief

    A split Third Circuit on Wednesday refused to revive a Honduran man's bid for deportation relief, saying the over 1,000 days he spent in detention before being sentenced for sexually assaulting his stepdaughter barred him from showing good moral character.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

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    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • Series

    Solving Puzzles Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Tackling daily puzzles — like Wordle, KenKen and Connections — has bolstered my intellectual property litigation practice by helping me to exercise different mental skills, acknowledge minor but important details, and build and reinforce good habits, says Roy Wepner at Kaplan Breyer.

  • Texas Ethics Opinion Flags Hazards Of Unauthorized Practice

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    The Texas Professional Ethics Committee's recently issued proposed opinion finding that in-house counsel providing legal services to the company's clients constitutes the unauthorized practice of law is a valuable clarification given that a UPL violation — a misdemeanor in most states — carries high stakes, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • In Memoriam: The Modern Administrative State

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    On June 28, the modern administrative state, where courts deferred to agency interpretations of ambiguous statutes, died when the U.S. Supreme Court overruled its previous decision in Chevron v. Natural Resources Defense Council — but it is survived by many cases decided under the Chevron framework, say Joseph Schaeffer and Jessica Deyoe at Babst Calland.

  • How To Clean Up Your Generative AI-Produced Legal Drafts

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    As law firms increasingly rely on generative artificial intelligence tools to produce legal text, attorneys should be on guard for the overuse of cohesive devices in initial drafts, and consider a few editing pointers to clean up AI’s repetitive and choppy outputs, says Ivy Grey at WordRake.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Various Paths For Labor And Employment Law

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    Labor and employment law leans heavily on federal agency guidance, so the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to toss out Chevron deference will ripple through this area, with future workplace policies possibly taking shape through strategic litigation, informal guidance, state-level regulation and more, says Alexander MacDonald at Littler.

  • Series

    Boxing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Boxing has influenced my legal work by enabling me to confidently hone the skills I've learned from the sport, like the ability to remain calm under pressure, evaluate an opponent's weaknesses and recognize when to seize an important opportunity, says Kirsten Soto at Clyde & Co.

  • Opinion

    Industry Self-Regulation Will Shine Post-Chevron

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's Loper decision will shape the contours of industry self-regulation in the years to come, providing opportunities for this often-misunderstood practice, says Eric Reicin at BBB National Programs.

  • 3 Ways Agencies Will Keep Making Law After Chevron

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    The U.S. Supreme Court clearly thinks it has done something big in overturning the Chevron precedent that had given deference to agencies' statutory interpretations, but regulated parties have to consider how agencies retain significant power to shape the law and its meaning, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Opinion

    Atty Well-Being Efforts Ignore Root Causes Of The Problem

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    The legal industry is engaged in a critical conversation about lawyers' mental health, but current attorney well-being programs primarily focus on helping lawyers cope with the stress of excessive workloads, instead of examining whether this work culture is even fundamentally compatible with lawyer well-being, says Jonathan Baum at Avenir Guild.

  • Series

    Skiing And Surfing Make Me A Better Lawyer

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    The skills I’ve learned while riding waves in the ocean and slopes in the mountains have translated to my legal career — developing strong mentor relationships, remaining calm in difficult situations, and being prepared and able to move to a backup plan when needed, says Brian Claassen at Knobbe Martens.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: June Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy considers two recent decisions from the Third and Tenth Circuits, and identifies practice tips around class action settlements and standing in securities litigation.

  • Unpacking The Circuit Split Over A Federal Atty Fee Rule

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    Federal circuit courts that have addressed Rule 41(d) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure are split as to whether attorney fees are included as part of the costs of a previously dismissed action, so practitioners aiming to recover or avoid fees should tailor arguments to the appropriate court, says Joseph Myles and Lionel Lavenue at Finnegan.

  • Lower Courts May Finally Be Getting The Memo After Ciminelli

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    A year after the U.S. Supreme Court again limited prosecutors' overbroad theories of fraud in Ciminelli v. U.S., early returns suggest that the message has at least partially landed with the lower courts, spotlighting lessons for defense counsel moving forward, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • After A Brief Hiccup, The 'Rocket Docket' Soars Back To No. 1

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    The Eastern District of Virginia’s precipitous 2022 fall from its storied rocket docket status appears to have been a temporary aberration, as recent statistics reveal that the court is once again back on top as the fastest federal civil trial court in the nation, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

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