More Employment Coverage

  • June 06, 2024

    Prof Can Test NC State Building For Carcinogens

    A split state appeals court has granted a former North Carolina State University employee stricken by cancer access to gather evidence in a campus building that studies showed contained cancer-causing materials.

  • June 06, 2024

    Paxton Blasts Firing Suit Probe As 'Lobbying' Move

    The Texas Attorney General's Office has asked the state's Supreme Court to shut down whistleblowers' attempt to depose Attorney General Ken Paxton and several high-ranking staffers, saying the tactic is designed to persuade lawmakers to fund a judgment in the case when he is not contesting their claims.

  • June 06, 2024

    Fla. Justices Won't Undo DeSantis' Suspension Of Prosecutor

    State prosecutor Monique Worrell lost her bid to be reinstated to her post in the Ninth Judicial Circuit after a split Florida Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Gov. Ron DeSantis' executive order suspending her passed muster.

  • June 06, 2024

    Ex-CFO Says McElroy Deutsch's $7M Relief Bid Is A Reach

    McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP's former chief financial officer said Thursday that his old firm's motion for partial summary judgment in a theft suit against him "seeks relief that far exceeds the scope" of his recent criminal guilty plea, defending his request that the New Jersey state court hold off ruling on the bid.

  • June 06, 2024

    Fisher Phillips' Management Trio Now Has Majority Of Women

    With Fisher Phillips' selection of a San Diego-based partner with experience spearheading women's advancement efforts to serve on its three-member management committee, the employer-side labor and employment firm is now led by a majority of women.

  • June 06, 2024

    Feds Copied Privileged Doc In OneTaste Charges, Execs Say

    Two executives of sexual wellness company OneTaste have renewed their bid to throw out the indictment against them on forced-labor conspiracy charges, claiming prosecutors used a privileged document to tailor the charges.

  • June 05, 2024

    Amazon Beats BIPA Suit Targeting Thermal Camera Use

    An Illinois federal judge handed Amazon a pretrial win over accusations that it violated workers' biometric privacy rights by using thermal cameras to screen for fevers during the pandemic, saying the company is immune from such claims under the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act.

  • June 05, 2024

    3rd Circ. Won't Put Trade Secrets Atty Fee Fight Before Jury

    The Third Circuit on Wednesday backed a jury verdict in favor of two former employees that a power trading company claimed took trade secrets to start a new firm, but rejected one defendant's bid to have a jury determine whether he gets attorney fees for what he called "bad-faith" litigation.

  • June 05, 2024

    Medtronic Can't Pause FCA Claims For 1st Circ. Detour

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Wednesday declined to pause a long-pending False Claims Act and whistleblower retaliation case against medical device maker Medtronic so it can appeal a recent ruling, saying the court and the parties need to "get it moving."

  • June 05, 2024

    Texas Atty Accuses Ex-Partner Of 'Unilaterally Doubling' Comp

    A Houston-area attorney is suing Bergquist Law Firm PLLC and its owner for nearly $7 million for "unrelenting" violations of their partnership agreement and fiduciary duties.

  • June 05, 2024

    US Tennis Wants Retrial After $9M Verdict In Sex Assault Suit

    The U.S. Tennis Association is pushing to undo a $9 million verdict over its failure to shield player Kylie McKenzie from her coach's sexual abuse, telling a Florida federal judge that the jury's decision is "against the weight of the evidence."

  • June 04, 2024

    Rep. Gaetz Backs FTC's Noncompete Ban In Court

    Rep. Matt Gaetz threw his support behind the Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday in a court battle over the agency's new rule banning employee noncompete clauses, arguing that Congress has repeatedly affirmed the commission's authority to make competition rules.

  • June 04, 2024

    Ga. Doc, Cos. Not Responsible For Credentialing, Panel Says

    The Georgia Court of Appeals on Tuesday affirmed the dismissal of claims against an anesthesiologist and two anesthesiology staffing companies accused of negligently credentialing a certified registered nurse anesthetist who allegedly caused a patient's death during a back pain alleviation procedure.

  • June 04, 2024

    Matterport Hit With Investor Suit Over $1.6B CoStar Deal Docs

    An investor of 3D building imaging company Matterport is attempting to prevent the company's proposed merger with real estate analytics company CoStar Group Inc., saying Matterport's deficient registration statement fails to show how the transaction will benefit public shareholders.

  • June 04, 2024

    LA Landfill Owner Faces Suits Over Foul Fumes, Runoff

    Some 800 people near a waste dump in Los Angeles County sued its operator for damages, alleging the company is liable for a smoldering underground fire at the site — the county's second-largest landfill — that has spewed toxic gas into the air for the last year, as well as geyser-like eruptions of polluted water from the ground.

  • June 04, 2024

    Mondelez, BCLP Must Face Negligence Claims Over 2023 Breach

    An Illinois federal judge has trimmed the majority of claims in proposed data privacy class actions brought by Mondelez workers against their employer and Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP stemming from a 2023 data breach, although the company and law firm couldn't shake the cases entirely. 

  • June 04, 2024

    Houston IP Firm Settles Trade Secrets Case With Ex-Law Clerk

    Houston-based intellectual property law firm Lloyd & Mousilli PLLC and a former law clerk accused of stealing confidential information while working virtually from California reached a settlement in a lawsuit brought by the firm in a Texas federal court.

  • June 04, 2024

    Ex-Restoration Co. Execs 'Teeter' On Contempt, Judge Says

    The former presidents of a property restoration company have staved off civil contempt after narrowly convincing a North Carolina Business Court judge that they merely misunderstood an injunction curbing their business activities as opposed to flagrantly disregarding it.

  • June 04, 2024

    Crash Victim Asks 11th Circ. To Revive Suit Against Port Co.

    A man who was hit by a dockworker driving his pickup truck at the Port of Savannah urged the Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday to revive his claims against the worker's employer, arguing that the worker was already on the job and not commuting when he caused the crash.

  • June 03, 2024

    California Pizza Kitchen Hack Deal Is Half Baked, 9th Circ. Told

    An attorney for objectors to a settlement between a class of current and former California Pizza Kitchen employees and the restaurant chain over a data breach told a Ninth Circuit panel on Monday that the district court did not properly scrutinize the deal or allegations of collusion between the parties.

  • June 03, 2024

    Ex-Biopharma Co. Prez Accused Of Defecting With Secrets

    Biopharmaceutical firm United Therapeutics Corp. has accused a former executive of violating an employment agreement by taking ideas to a rival company to develop a competing lung treatment.

  • June 03, 2024

    Substitute Teacher Co. Says Colo. Classification Rule Illegal

    An independent platform said that an upcoming Colorado rule requiring it to consider employees the substitute teachers it helps schools find will hurt its business, urging a Colorado state court to halt the new policy going into effect on July 1.

  • June 03, 2024

    FTC Gets Backing Against Noncompete Rule Challenge

    The Federal Trade Commission has received backing against a challenge of its new rule banning noncompete clauses, with a labor group, local lawmakers and others urging a Texas federal court not to prevent the rule from taking effect in September.

  • June 03, 2024

    Ex-Canadian Hockey League Team's VP Drops Suit Over Firing

    The former vice president of finance for the Canadian Hockey League's Portland Winterhawks has dropped his defamation lawsuit against his former team and its general manager, two months after accusing them in Oregon federal court of firing him over false embezzlement claims.

  • June 03, 2024

    Fla. Judge Won't Trim Mercer's Suit Against Ex-Adviser

    A Florida judge on Friday denied an investment adviser's bid to end claims by the parent company of her former employer Mercer Global Advisors' suit accusing her of stealing clients and interfering with its business.

Expert Analysis

  • Beware OSHA's Aggressive Stance Toward Safety Violations

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    The solicitor of labor's recent enforcement report shows the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will increasingly consider creative enforcement measures and even criminal referrals to hold employers accountable for workplace safety infractions, say Ronald Taylor and Page Kim at Venable.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • The Tricky Implications Of New Calif. Noncompete Laws

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    Two new California noncompete laws that ban certain out-of-state agreements and require employers to notify certain workers raise novel issues related to mergers and acquisitions, and pose particular challenges for technology companies, says John Viola at Thompson Coburn.

  • Patent Ownership Issues In Light Of USPTO AI Guidance

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    Recently published guidance from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office establishes that inventions created using artificial intelligence may be patentable if a human also significantly contributes, but ownership and legal rights in these types of patents are different issues that require further assessment, says Karl Gross at Leydig Voit.

  • Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Fears About The End Of Chevron Deference Are Overblown

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    While some are concerned about repercussions if the U.S. Supreme Court brings an end to Chevron deference in the Loper and Relentless cases this term, agencies and attorneys would survive just fine under the doctrines that have already begun to replace it, say Daniel Wolff and Henry Leung at Crowell & Moring.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Preparing For Possible Calif. Criminal Antitrust Enforcement

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    Though a recent announcement that the California Attorney General's Office will resume criminal prosecutions in support of its antitrust enforcement may be mere saber-rattling, companies and their counsel should nevertheless be prepared for interactions with the California AG's Antitrust Section that are not limited to civil liability issues, say Dylan Ballard and Lillian Sun at V&E.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Calif. High Court Ruling Has Lessons For Waiving Jury Trials

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    The California Supreme Court’s recent decision in TriCoast Builders v. Fonnegra, denying relief to a contractor that had waived its right to a jury trial, shows that litigants should always post jury fees as soon as possible, and seek writ review if the court denies relief from a waiver, say Steven Fleischman and Nicolas Sonnenburg at Horvitz & Levy.

  • A Look At 3 Noncompete Bans Under Consideration In NYC

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    A trio of noncompete bills currently pending in the New York City Council would have various effects on employers' abilities to enter into such agreements with their employees, reflecting growing anti-noncompete sentiment across the U.S., say Tracey Diamond and Grace Goodheart at Troutman Pepper.

  • Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • 2nd Circ. Baby Food Ruling Disregards FDA's Expertise

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    The Second Circuit's recent decision in White v. Beech-Nut Nutrition, refusing to defer litigation over heavy metals in baby food until the U.S. Food and Drug Administration weighs in on the issue, provides no indication that courts will resolve the issue with greater efficiency than the FDA, say attorneys at Phillips Lytle.

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