More Employment Coverage

  • June 11, 2024

    Ex-DraftKings Exec Seeks Fast Trial To Test Noncompete Law

    A former DraftKings executive wants a snap trial to unwind a noncompete blocking him from work at sports-betting rival Fanatics, calling the fiercely litigated, bicoastal dispute a "test case" for California's recent law reinforcing a ban on restrictive covenants.

  • June 11, 2024

    Foley & Lardner Accused Of Underpaying Recruiter

    A legal recruiter accused Foley & Lardner LLP in a Massachusetts state court lawsuit of taking advantage of a 13-year-old contract to pay it a "woefully insufficient" fee for helping to lure a multimillion-dollar partner from another firm earlier this year.

  • June 11, 2024

    Former McElroy Deutsch Exec Fights Home Claim In Theft Suit

    With her husband having pled guilty to stealing over $1.5 million from McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP last month, the firm's former business development director held firm this week that a New Jersey state court must reject the firm's bid to put the couple's house in a constructive trust.

  • June 11, 2024

    Immigration Firm Says Rival Poached Workers And Stole TM

    A Washington immigration law firm specializing in visas for domestic violence and sex trafficking victims is accusing a competing Texas firm of poaching its employees and stealing a Spanish phrase covered by its trademark — "Arreglar sin salir!" — which translates to "fix without leaving."

  • June 10, 2024

    Navy Liable In 'Take-Home' Asbestos Death, Trial Judge Told

    The U.S. Navy can't avoid a $12 million wrongful death suit by arguing asbestos safeguards were only advisory at a Washington state shipyard in the 1970s, counsel to the family of a service member's deceased spouse said Monday at the start of a bench trial.

  • June 10, 2024

    Ex-LA Chinatown Bank CFO Gets 3 Years For Embezzlement

    The former chief financial officer of a bank based in Los Angeles' Chinatown has been sentenced to three years in prison after pleading guilty to bank fraud for embezzling more than $700,000 from his employer.

  • June 10, 2024

    Feds Want Ex-Army Officer's FTCA Claims Cut From Suit

    A former major general's defamation lawsuit against the U.S. Army over an alleged domestic assault should be partially tossed, the federal government told a Pennsylvania federal judge Friday, arguing that soldiers can't sue the Army for incidents that happened while they were serving.

  • June 10, 2024

    Parexel Says Staffing Firm Liable For Temp's Alleged Fraud

    Clinical research company Parexel International says a Boston-based staffing agency is liable for damages caused by a rogue temporary employee who engaged in "egregious fraud" involving multiple drug trials, according to a complaint filed in Massachusetts state court.

  • June 10, 2024

    Goldberg Segalla Adds Toxic Torts, Workers' Comp Attys

    Goldberg Segalla LLP has added two attorneys working in practice areas such as toxic torts and workers' compensation as partners in its offices in Manhattan and Garden City, New York, the firm announced Monday.

  • June 10, 2024

    Lin Wood's Ex-Colleagues Push To Keep Fraud Claims In Trial

    Former law partners of controversial attorney Lin Wood have urged a Georgia federal court to block Wood's request to exclude unadjudicated allegations he committed fraud and contract breach, arguing that the details are relevant in an upcoming trial over the ex-colleagues' claims that Wood defamed them.

  • June 10, 2024

    Cooley Adds Comp Partners From Cadwalader, Wilson Sonsini

    Cooley LLP announced the addition of two partners from Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft LLP and Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati PC on Monday, touting their combined five decades of experience in compensation and benefits.

  • June 10, 2024

    Medical-Aesthetic Device Rivals Set For Sept. Poaching Trial

    A Boston federal judge on Monday scheduled a post-Labor Day jury trial for medical-aesthetic device company Cynosure's $78 million poaching lawsuit against rival Reveal Lasers, urging the parties to streamline their exhibits and damages claims.

  • June 10, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Big players and big moves dominated much of the past week in Delaware's Court of Chancery, as Tesla in particular and big corporations in general showed their pique over rulings that went toward stockholders or against conventional expectations.

  • June 10, 2024

    Mass. Nursing Home To Pay Record $4M Over Neglect Claims

    A Massachusetts nursing home operator has agreed to pay a total of $4 million and hire an independent monitor to settle allegations that understaffing at its 16 facilities led to substandard care and patients being harmed, the attorney general’s office announced Monday. Next Step Healthcare LLC has agreed pay $750,000 directly to the state and dedicate the remaining $3.25 million toward increasing staffing levels.

  • June 07, 2024

    Tesla Rips 'Unprecedented' $5.6B Fee Bid In Musk Pay Fight

    Tesla urged Delaware's Chancery Court on Friday to reject a $5.6 billion stock-based fee request by counsel representing investors who blocked Elon Musk's record Tesla pay package, arguing the "unprecedented" fee bid is unreasonable, unwarranted and 17 times larger than any fee award in Delaware history.

  • June 07, 2024

    Off The Bench: NFL On Trial, Betting Crackdowns, Tennis Suit

    In this week's Off The Bench, the NFL stands trial in a massive antitrust class action over its Sunday Ticket broadcast package, a series of sports betting crackdowns makes waves in the MLB and the NBA, and the U.S. Tennis Association denies any liability for a player's sexual assault by her coach.

  • June 07, 2024

    Fla. Builder's Former In-House Atty Beats DQ Bid In Firing Suit

    A Florida federal judge has rejected a development company's bid to disqualify the Boatman Ricci law firm from representing the company's former in-house counsel in his wrongful termination lawsuit.

  • June 07, 2024

    Philly Legal Services Group Backs FTC Noncompete Ban

    Community Legal Services, which represents the poorest Philadelphians in legal matters, threw its support Friday behind the Federal Trade Commission's bid to ban business from forcing employees into noncompete agreements.

  • June 07, 2024

    Lewis Brisbois Wants Ex-Partner's Pay Bias Suit In Arbitration

    Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP has asked a Los Angeles court to force arbitration of claims lodged by a former partner in a suit accusing the firm of gender discrimination in pay and retaliation for raising concerns over its "unethical billing practices."

  • June 06, 2024

    Tesla Sued Over Vote On Revived $55B CEO Pay, Texas Move

    Tesla, its board of directors and CEO Elon Musk were hit with a proposed class action in Delaware Chancery Court on Thursday over the company's plan to seek stockholder approval for the same $55.8 billion Musk compensation plan voided in January, along with reincorporation of Tesla as a Texas company.

  • June 06, 2024

    Alec Baldwin Faces New 'Rust' Shooting Civil Claims In NM

    The family of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins, who was shot and killed on the set of "Rust," has lodged another civil suit against Alec Baldwin, this time in New Mexico, according to a complaint filed Wednesday in Santa Fe County court.

  • June 06, 2024

    Ameriprise Says Father-Son Ex-Reps Stole Client Info

    Ameriprise Financial seeks a restraining order against two former employees, a father-son duo, and their new employer, saying the men took boxes of confidential documents "in the dark of the night" to transfer to their new roles.

  • June 06, 2024

    Wash. Judge Suggests Insurer Dragged Out IP Dispute

    A Washington federal judge appeared unconvinced Thursday by a dental health insurer's argument that it acted honestly in pushing forward with trade secret claims even after the accused ex-employee returned her company-issued laptop that purportedly held sensitive information.

  • June 06, 2024

    8th Circ. Affirms Cigna Noncompete Applies To CVS Hire

    The Eighth Circuit has backed a lower court finding that blocked a healthcare industry executive from making a move to CVS, handing a win to Cigna in a case over trade secrets.

  • June 06, 2024

    3 Takeaways From Probe That Halted WWE Staffer's Suit

    The pause of a former World Wrestling Entertainment legal staffer's sex-trafficking lawsuit amid a probe by New York federal prosecutors suggests the civil claims could be the basis of forthcoming criminal charges for co-founder Vince McMahon or the organization, or both.

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Ways To Refresh Your Law Firm's Marketing Strategy

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    With many BigLaw firms relying on an increasingly obsolete marketing approach that prioritizes stiff professionalism over authentic connection, adopting a few key communications strategies to better connect with today's clients and prospects can make all the difference, say Eric Pacifici and Kevin Henderson at SMB Law.

  • Highlights From The 2024 ABA Antitrust Spring Meeting

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    U.S. merger enforcement and cartels figured heavily in this year's American Bar Association spring antitrust meeting, where one key takeaway included news that the Federal Trade Commission's anticipated changes to the Hart-Scott-Rodino form may be less dramatic than many originally feared, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • Cannabis Ruling Lights Path For Bankruptcy Protection

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    A recent Massachusetts bankruptcy appellate court ruling in Blumsack v. Harrington leaves the door open for those employed in the cannabis industry to seek bankruptcy relief where certain conditions are met, but rescheduling marijuana as a Schedule III drug may complicate matters, say Jane Haviland and Kathryn Droumbakis at Mintz.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Circumstantial Evidence Requires A Pointillist Approach

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    Because complex cases with sophisticated defendants are unlikely to reveal much, if any, direct evidence, attorneys must aggregate many pieces of circumstantial evidence into a cohesive narrative — much like the painting technique of pointillism, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • A Look At Global Employee Disconnect Laws For US Counsel

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    As countries worldwide adopt employee right to disconnect laws, U.S. in-house counsel at corporations with a global workforce must develop a comprehensive understanding of the laws' legal and cultural implications, ensuring their companies can safeguard employee welfare while maintaining legal compliance, say Emma Corcoran and Ute Krudewagen at DLA Piper.

  • When Trade Secret Protection And Nat'l Security Converge

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    The Trump administration's anti-espionage program focused on China is over, but federal enforcement efforts to protect trade secrets and U.S. national security continue, and companies doing business in high-risk jurisdictions need to maintain their compliance programs to avoid the risk of being caught in the crosshairs of an investigation, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • The Merger Cases That Will Matter At ABA Antitrust Meeting

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    While the American Bar Association's Antitrust Spring Meeting this week will cover all types of competition law issues in the U.S. and abroad, expect the federal agencies' recent track record in merger enforcement to be a key area of focus on the official panels and in cocktail party chatter, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • A Snapshot Of The Evolving Restrictive Covenant Landscape

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    Rachael Martinez and Brooke Bahlinger at Foley highlight recent trends in the hotly contested regulation and enforcement of noncompetition and related nonsolicitation covenants, and provide guidance on drafting such provisions within the context of stand-alone employment agreements and merger or acquisition transactions.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

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