Colorado

  • June 12, 2024

    Colo. DA's Probe Harms Justice System, Ex-Judge Says

    A former Colorado state judge told an attorney disciplinary panel Wednesday that a district attorney's push to interview the judge's ex-wife after he made adverse rulings for the prosecution in a high-profile murder case was prompted by a "baseless conspiracy theory" and harmful to judicial independence.

  • June 12, 2024

    Internet Co. Hit With $4M Default Judgment Over Tower Bills

    TPT SpeedConnect has been slapped with a nearly $4 million judgment after it stopped footing the bill on some 60 of its license agreements, which allowed the internet service provider to keep its telecom equipment installed on others' towers in exchange for rent.

  • June 12, 2024

    Doctor Says Lawyer, Insurer Agreed To Backdoor Settlement

    A Colorado neurosurgeon accused an attorney and an insurer of interfering with the legal services provided to him in defense of an underlying medical malpractice suit, telling a state court the underlying suit was settled without his consent, elevating the carrier and its insured's interests over his own.

  • June 12, 2024

    32 AGs Urge Justices Take Up Okla. PBM Law Fight

    Thirty-two attorneys general urged the U.S. Supreme Court to take up Oklahoma's petition for review of a Tenth Circuit decision holding that federal law preempted portions of a state law regulating pharmacy benefit managers, arguing the justices needed to intervene to resolve a circuit split.

  • June 12, 2024

    Colo. Tech Co. Says Startup Founder Can't Shield Sale Docs

    A Colorado technology company is arguing that the founder of a startup it acquired shouldn't be allowed to withhold nearly half of the documents it is seeking by asserting privilege in his $15 million fraud suit, as he claimed to rely on his law firm's advice when he approved the deal.

  • June 12, 2024

    Grad Student Says School Dismissed Her Over Health Issues

    A graduate counseling student is suing a Colorado private university for failing to accommodate her fibromyalgia and other health conditions, alleging in a federal complaint that the school refused to grant her a degree based on issues related to her disabilities.

  • June 11, 2024

    Berkshire Unit Wants $20M Antitrust Loss Tossed Or New Trial

    A Berkshire Hathaway-owned construction supplier asked a Colorado federal judge Monday to reverse its $20 million jury trial loss to a smaller rival in the insulation material business, arguing that the damages are untethered to the alleged conduct, especially under a Tenth Circuit decision reviving the antitrust lawsuit.

  • June 11, 2024

    Cannabis Co. Sued Over Veteran's Psychotic Episode

    A U.S. Navy veteran says a psychotic episode he experienced after smoking cannabis led to him shooting his girlfriend and two dogs.

  • June 11, 2024

    Dish Fights To Weigh In On Spectrum False Claims Act Case

    Dish Network deserves a say in whether the whistleblower claims accusing it of using sham companies to scam the government out of some $3.3 billion are dismissed — and the relator's suggestion that it doesn't is "facially absurd," the company has told the court.

  • June 11, 2024

    Colo. Eviction Law Firm Hit With Suit Over Fee Mark-Ups

    A Colorado law firm that specializes in representing landlords in evictions was hit Tuesday with another federal lawsuit alleging the firm violated debt collection laws with the billing of tenants for attorney fees before eviction proceedings are resolved.

  • June 11, 2024

    Enviro Suit Says BLM Well Policy Leaves Drilling Unchecked

    An environmental group is suing the Bureau of Land Management to invalidate drilling permits in and around Colorado's Pawnee National Grassland, claiming the agency has given up authority to regulate the surface impacts of certain wells in violation of its federal mandates.

  • June 11, 2024

    J&J Inks $700M Deal To End AGs' Talc Marketing Suits

    Forty-three state attorneys general on Tuesday said there has been a $700 million nationwide settlement and a consent judgment has been reached with Johnson & Johnson that ends claims it misled consumers about the safety of its talc products.

  • June 10, 2024

    Colo. Justice Blasts Majority Decision In Judge DQ Case

    The Colorado Supreme Court reinstated a man's motor vehicle theft conviction Monday after he convinced a lower court to overturn it because the judge who presided over his trial should have been disqualified, with a dissenting justice arguing the ruling upends "long-settled law" as to when the right to seek such disqualification can be deemed to have been waived.

  • June 10, 2024

    Colo. DA Defends Interviewing Ex-Wife Of Murder Case Judge

    A Colorado district attorney on Monday denied that she botched a high-profile murder case targeting a husband in his wife's disappearance, telling a disciplinary panel that her concerns about the judge's honesty justified sending an investigator to interview the jurist's ex-spouse.

  • June 10, 2024

    Colo. Justices Say Toxic Tort Plaintiffs Didn't Waive Privilege

    Colorado's justices on Monday said plaintiffs suing a medical sterilization plant over exposure to a carcinogen cannot be forced to turn over communications with their lawyers related to an expert report, rejecting the plant's argument that the disclosure of a spreadsheet to an expert waived attorney-client privilege.

  • June 10, 2024

    Colo. Justices Say Doc-Patient Privilege Mirrors Atty-Client

    The Colorado Supreme Court held Monday that doctor-patient privilege does persist after a patient dies but that a "testamentary exception" exists for when a late patient's medical records become necessary information to execute their estate, similar to how attorney-client privilege works.

  • June 10, 2024

    Migrant Cleaners Rebuff Colo. Hotel's Bid To Ditch Wage Suit

    The migrant contractor staff that cleaned a Colorado luxury hotel slammed the hotel's efforts to escape claims of underpaying its workers, telling a Colorado federal court Monday that the hotel set the terms of their employment.

  • June 11, 2024

    UPDATED: Court Says Eastman Disbarment Order Filed In Error

    A California federal court has nixed an order disbarring former Donald Trump lawyer John C. Eastman from the venue, saying in a notice filed Tuesday that the document was filed by mistake.

  • June 07, 2024

    Real Estate Authority: EPA's Brownfield Funding Surge

    Catch up on this week's key developments by state from Law360 Real Estate Authority — including a new data series on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's brownfield grant program.

  • June 07, 2024

    Gov't Presses For Dismissal Of False Claim Case Against Dish

    The federal government has said a false claim suit against Dish Network Corp. "will not vindicate the government's interests" and has asked the D.C. federal judge to dismiss the case Vermont National Telephone Co. filed over Dish buying discounted spectrum.

  • June 07, 2024

    Parking Lot Tech Co. Wants Rival To Hit The Brakes

    A Texas company that develops parking enforcement technology is suing a competitor in Colorado federal court, claiming the rival is infringing three of its patents that cover the use of a camera to track vehicles entering and exiting lots, automated fees, and ticketing. 

  • June 07, 2024

    FCA, Cummins' $6M Engine Defect Deal Gets OK'd

    A Michigan federal judge gave the go-ahead Friday to a $6 million settlement to resolve claims that Cummins Inc. made defective engines that went into FCA US LLC's Dodge Ram vehicles. FCA, now part of Stellantis NV, was once better known as Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV.

  • June 07, 2024

    Brewery Wants Extra Damages For Co-Owner's 'Brazen' Theft

    A Colorado brewery accusing a former manager of embezzling hundreds of thousands of dollars has asked a state court for permission to seek exemplary damages, saying there's plenty of evidence the former manager willfully stole the money for himself and competing businesses he had a stake in.

  • June 07, 2024

    Ex-NFL Pro's Appeal Calls League's Benefit System Defective

    A former NFL player whose benefits suit was tossed by a Texas federal judge after eight doctors said he could work has appealed to the Fifth Circuit, arguing that the evaluation system used by the NFL is flawed and "morally repugnant."

  • June 07, 2024

    Woman Sues Atty After Colo. Justices Tossed Tardy Suit

    A woman whose personal injury suit was recently found to be untimely by the Colorado Supreme Court — which admitted case law in her circumstances is "confusing" — is now suing her former lawyer, alleging his delay cost her the case.

Expert Analysis

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • Momofuku Chili War May Chill Common Phrase TM Apps

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    Momofuku’s recent trademark battle over the “Chili Crunch” mark shows that over-enforcement when protecting exclusivity rights may backfire not just in the public eye, but with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office as well, says Anthony Panebianco at Davis Malm.

  • How Cannabis Rescheduling May Alter Paraphernalia Imports

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    The Biden administration's recent proposal to loosen federal restrictions on marijuana use raises questions about how U.S. Customs and Border Protection enforcement policies may shift when it comes to enforcing a separate federal ban on marijuana accessory imports, says R. Kevin Williams at Clark Hill.

  • Live Nation May Shake It Off In A Long Game With The DOJ

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    Don't expect a swift resolution in the U.S. Department of Justice's case against Live Nation, but a long litigation, with the company likely to represent itself as the creator of a competitive ecosystem, and the government faced with explaining how the ticketing giant formed under its watch, say Thomas Kliebhan and Taylor Hixon at GRSM50.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

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    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Circuit Judge Writes An Opinion, AI Helps: What Now?

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    Last week's Eleventh Circuit opinion in Snell v. United Specialty Insurance, notable for a concurrence outlining the use of artificial intelligence to evaluate a term's common meaning, is hopefully the first step toward developing a coherent basis for the judiciary's generative AI use, says David Zaslowsky at Baker McKenzie.

  • Perspectives

    Trauma-Informed Legal Approaches For Pro Bono Attorneys

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    As National Trauma Awareness Month ends, pro bono attorneys should nevertheless continue to acknowledge the mental and physical effects of trauma, allowing them to better represent clients, and protect themselves from compassion fatigue and burnout, say Katherine Cronin at Stinson and Katharine Manning at Blackbird.

  • Series

    Playing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My deep and passionate involvement in playing, writing and producing music equipped me with skills — like creativity, improvisation and problem-solving — that contribute to the success of my legal career, says attorney Kenneth Greene.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Pitfalls When Withdrawing From A Case

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    The Trump campaign's recent scuffle over its bid to replace its counsel in a pregnancy retaliation suit offers a chance to remind attorneys that many troubles inherent in withdrawing from a case can be mitigated or entirely avoided by communicating with clients openly and frequently, says Christopher Konneker at Orsinger Nelson.

  • Using A Children's Book Approach In Firm Marketing Content

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    From “The Giving Tree” to “Where the Wild Things Are,” most children’s books are easy to remember because they use simple words and numbers to tell stories with a human impact — a formula law firms should emulate in their marketing content to stay front of mind for potential clients, says Seema Desai Maglio at The Found Word.

  • The State Of Play In DEI And ESG 1 Year After Harvard Ruling

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    Almost a year after the U.S. Supreme Court decided Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard, attorney general scrutiny of environmental, social and governance-related efforts indicates a potential path for corporate diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives to be targeted, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • What The FTC Report On AG Collabs Means For Cos.

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    The Federal Trade Commission's April report on working with state attorneys general shows collaboration can increase efficiency and consistency in how statutes are interpreted and enforced, which can minimize the likelihood of requests for inconsistent injunctive relief that can create operational problems for businesses, say attorneys at Kelley Drye.

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